Programs

Active Start Testimonial 


Special Olympics BC's Active Start program fills a void in our son's life. He loves playing with the equipment, and it is gratifying to see the confidence he is gaining both physically and mentally as he achieves goals and does things he couldn't do before. We look forward to sharing future accomplishments with Active Start."
 

-James Sutherland, parent of former Active Start and current FUNdamentals participant Oliver

10 Pin Bowling
 

Bowling is one of the highest-participation sports in Special Olympics Canada, and 5-pin bowling is the most popular by far, with more than 2,100 registered athletes in B.C. Although there are some modifications made for athletes with physical disabilities, most athletes compete under the same rules and circumstances as those on a professional tour.

5 Pin Bowling

Bowling is one of the highest-participation sports in Special Olympics Canada, and 5-pin bowling is the most popular by far, with more than 2,100 registered athletes in B.C. Although there are some modifications made for athletes with physical disabilities, most athletes compete under the same rules and circumstances as those on a professional tour.

Active Start 
 

Active Start is a family-centred activity program targeting children with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 2 and 6. Through the Active Start program, children learn basic motor skills such as walking, running, jumping and throwing in a fun and safe environment.

Children who get involved with Active Start can't stop smiling, and their parents and caregivers have a great time playing along and watching their kids blossom and develop essential skills. The Active Start and FUNdamentals programs are sport initiatives developed by Special Olympics BC to teach basic motor and sport skills through fun and positive movement experiences for children with intellectual disabilities.

Aquatics
 

Aquatics (swimming) offers a wide array of swimming events that are appropriate for athletes of various ages and ability levels. Aquatics training and competitions are available in a variety of strokes and at a variety of levels.
 

Aquatics events:

  • Freestyle Events: 25M, 50M, 100M, 200M, 400M

  • Backstroke Events: 25M, 50M, 100M, 200M

  • Breaststroke Events: 25M, 50M, 100M, 200M

  • Butterfly Events: 25M, 50M, 100M, 200M

  • Individual Medley Events: 100M, 200M

  • Freestyle Relay Events: 4 x 25M, 4 x 50M, 4 x 100M

  • Medley Relay Events: 4 x 50M

 

Athletics
 

Athletics (track & field) includes a wide range of exciting events including track, distance, field and multi-disciplinary competitions. Special Olympics BC also offers events for lower ability level athletes to train and compete in basic athletics skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to longer competitive events.
 

Track events:

  • 100, 200, 400 and 800 Metre Run

  • Hurdles: Women - 100 Metre, Men - 110 Metre

  • Relays - 4 x 100, 4 x 400 Metre
     

Distance events:

  • 1500, 3000, and 5000 Metre
     

Field events:

  • High Jump

  • Running Long Jump

  • Standing Long Jump

  • Shot Put: Women 2.72 kg/6 lbs, Men (16 yrs. and over 4 kg/8.13 lbs) or (16 yrs. and under 2.72 kg/ 6lbs)
     

Multi-event:

  • Pentathlon (Five events: 100 Metres, Long Jump, Shot Put, High Jump, 400 Metres)
     

The following events provide meaningful competition for athletes with lower ability levels:

  • 50-Metre Developmental

Basketball

Basketball teaches teamwork and skills of the game in five-per-side team competition. Teams are grouped in divisions according to the athletes' ability level. Athletes can also compete in individual skills contests. These events are designed for the lower ability athletes.

The following events provide meaningful competition for athletes with lower ability levels:

  • Target pass

  • 10-metre dribble

  • Spot shot

  • Speed dribble

 

                                                                                   

 

                                                                                           

 

                                                                                                                                                             Basketball C Team Photo (2021) 

 

 

Bocce

Bocce is a game of skill and strategy. Each player is given two balls and takes a turn rolling the ball toward the smallest ball (pallina), which has already been thrown onto the field. The players are given points for the balls thrown closest to the pallina. Players may also throw on the fly, striking the ball to move the pallina. Other players can displace the balls (including the pallina).

Curling

Curling requires strategy, physical ability and a true team effort. Athletes work in teams of four, in an attempt to place their rocks closest to the centre of a series of four rings called the house. The team with the most number of stones closest to the centre is awarded points accordingly. Teams typically play eight ends and the team with the most points at the end is declared the winner.

Figure Skating

Figure skating is one of the few judged sports in Special Olympics. It features impressive feats of strength, precision, artistry and the interpretation or rhythm and tempo of music through dance steps on ice.

Figure skating events:

  • Singles Competitions (Singles Levels 1-6)

  • Pair Skating (Pair Levels 1-2)

  • Ice Dancing (Levels 1-4) All ice dancing competitions may be skated solo or may be skated by a dance team comprised of two Special Olympics athletes, one male and one female, two females, or two males)

Club Fit

Club Fit is a fitness program designed specifically for Special Olympics athletes of varying skill levels to improve their health and fitness outside of participation in other Special Olympics programs.

Intended for participants ages 14 and up, Club Fit provides SOBC athletes an opportunity to improve overall health and fitness throughout the year with quality programs that supplement their participation in traditional sport programs. Club Fit also provides opportunities to help new athletes (or athletes that have left sport programs) to improve overall health and fitness for their whole life. Athletes who register with Special Olympics can take part in Club Fit as the only program they are registered in.

Club Fit is part of the Special Olympics long-term athlete development model. It aims to improve athletes’ overall wellness by helping them optimize potential and provide lifelong activity opportunities.

Club Fit sets standards for fitness programs for Special Olympics athletes in British Columbia.

SOBC has a growing base of flexible Club Fit resources that can be combined by program leaders in numerous ways to achieve a high-quality program that meets the fitness goals of all athletes.

Floor Hockey

Floor hockey is adapted from the games of ice hockey and ringette and is the only team sport in Special Olympics Winter Sports. Floor hockey is played in a rink surfaced with wood or concrete, not ice. The teams are composed of six players, including a goalie. Athletes use wooden poles (without blades) as sticks and large felt discs with an open centre as pucks.

Special Olympics Floor Hockey also offers individual skills competition to allow athletes to train and compete in basic floor hockey skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to team play.

Floor hockey events:
 

  • Team Competition

 

The following events provide meaningful competition for athletes with lower ability levels:

  • Shoot Around the Goal

  • Pass

  • Stickhandling

  • Shoot for Accuracy

  • Defense

FUNdamentals

The FUNdamentals program is a continuation of the Active Start program for children with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 7 and 11, with the skills transitioning from basic movement skills to basic sport skills. The family-centred program provides children with a more in-depth introduction to sport-related motor skills along with training and competition, while maintaining an atmosphere of fun and meaningful interaction.

The 12-week program introduces the sports of soccer, softball, basketball and track and field, and provides children with the opportunity to learn and practice the sport skills necessary for participants to later move into community or traditional Special Olympics programs.

The FUNdamentals program also introduces basic nutrition information to both parents and children through a series of fun activities at the conclusion of each session.

The athletes-in-training who delight in their Active Start and FUNdamentals programs can take their sports skills to the next level by participating SOBC's Sport Start programs

High Impact Club Fit

Club Fit is a fitness program designed specifically for Special Olympics athletes of varying skill levels to improve their health and fitness outside of participation in other Special Olympics programs.
 

Intended for participants ages 14 and up, Club Fit provides SOBC athletes an opportunity to improve overall health and fitness throughout the year with quality programs that supplement their participation in traditional sport programs. Club Fit also provides opportunities to help new athletes (or athletes that have left sport programs) to improve overall health and fitness for their whole life. Athletes who register with Special Olympics can take part in Club Fit as the only program they are registered in.
 

Club Fit is part of the Special Olympics long-term athlete development model. It aims to improve athletes’ overall wellness by helping them optimize potential and provide lifelong activity opportunities.

Club Fit sets standards for fitness programs for Special Olympics athletes in British Columbia.

SOBC has a growing base of flexible Club Fit resources that can be combined by program leaders in numerous ways to achieve a high-quality program that meets the fitness goals of all athletes.

Rhythmic Gymnastics 
 

Rhythmic Gymnastics helps gymnasts develop strength, flexibility and artistry. Competitions are offered for women in rhythmic events. Gymnasts may compete in all events offered (all around) or may be specialists, competing in one, two or more (but not all) events.
 

Rhythmic Gymnastics events (Level I and up for females only):

  • Clubs

  • Rope

  • Hoop

  • Ball

  • Ribbon

  • All Around

  • Group Routines (Female only, 4-6 gymnasts, may be done in addition to individual routines)

  • Floor Exercise

  • Ball
     

The following events provide meaningful competition for athletes with lower ability levels:

  • Rhythmic Gymnastistics Individual Compulsory Routines, performed while sitting (mixed gender)

  • Rope

  • Hoop

  • Ball

  • Ribbon

  • All Around

Soccer 
 

Soccer is one of the world's most popular sports, and is also one of the most popular sports within Special Olympics.In addition to offering seven-a-side soccer, Special Olympics soccer offers individual skills competition to allow athletes to train and compete in basic soccer skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to team competition.
 

Soccer events:

  • Seven-a-side team (outdoor)
     

The following events provide meaningful competition for athletes with lower ability levels:

  • Dribbling #1

  • Shooting

  • Run and Kick

  • Dribbling #2

  • Control and Pass

Softball

Softball is an exciting Special Olympics team sport. Special Olympics athletes play slo-pitch softball, which involves two teams of 10 athletes. Special Olympics offers individual skills competition to allow athletes to train and compete in basic softball skills. The development of these key skills is necessary prior to advancing to team competition.
 

Softball events:

  • Slo-Pitch Team Competition
     

The following events provide meaningful competition for athletes with lower ability levels:

  • Hitting

  • Base Running

  • Fielding

  • Throwing

Competitions Testimonial 


“My most memorable experience was meeting awesome athletes and competing against the very best competitors,” SOBC – Vernon athletics athlete Danielle Pechet said

 

Danielle Pechet- OBC – Vernon athletics athlete  

Volunteer Testimonial


S"I have learned so much because of my involvement. What really matters and what really keeps me motivated are the athletes and parents who can't imagine their lives without Special Olympics." –
 

-Maureen Hunter, SOBC – Campbell River Local Coordinator

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